Apple Nachos for Tu BiShvat

This super easy plate of Apple Nachos is perfect for Tu BiShvat! You can add many of The Seven Sacred Foods (Shivat HaMinim) mentioned in Deuteronomy / Devarim chapter 8 in the Torah. It also makes a great snack any other time of year.

This vegan Golden Turmeric Cake is moist, just dense enough, and has the perfect sweetness level. It has a delicate crumb and a subtle lemon flavor with a lovely golden yellow color from the turmeric. This cake is featured in the Jewish Food Hero cookbook Feeding Women of the Talmud, Feeding Ourselves by Kenden Alfond, the Jewish Book Council 2022 Notable Notable Book.

This super fresh herb and bulgur Mediterranean salad is the perfect snack, side, or even meal when paired with hummus and pita bread! It can be made gluten-free by swapping the bulgur grain for a gluten-free option like quinoa.

Juicy, tender, and satisfying, this vegan brisket is a perfect dinner or holiday centerpiece. Slow roasted so it’s fork-tender, this seitan brisket will have vegans and non-vegans raving. An Instant Pot is NOT required for the first half of the cooking process–you can steam it on your stovetop, but an Instant Pot saves time.

This is easy, satisfying comfort food. Kasha is buckwheat or groats, and varnishkes is Yiddish and means (or some will argue it only implies) bow-tie pasta. It’s traditionally made with schmaltz, but this version is vegan and totally delicious.

This simple, fast, and easy chopped salad is the perfect side for any time of year. Also sometimes referred to as Israeli salad or Middle Eastern salad, it’s a classic that goes with any meal.

Baba ghanouj originates from Lebanon and is pronounced as ba-ba gha-noosh (or nooj) in Arabic. Baba ghanouj is also known as baba ganoush, bab ganouj or baba ganousche. It is written as بابا غنوج in Arabic.

The word baba means daddy and the word ghanouj means spoilt. So this is a spoilt daddy dip, haha.

It’s the dried mint in this very creamy and luxurious Baba Ghanouj recipe that makes this Lebanese eggplant dip taste even more spectacular.

A couple of my Lebanese friends even commented how wonderful it is as their family usually make it without. My Lebanese family wins!

This recipe is from my Mother’s recipe index, there are a couple of variations she has passed to me;

smokey
boiled
baked
with garlic, or without
with mint or without, but mostly with.
Whichever way baba ghanouj is made, this authentic Lebanese eggplant dip (or aubergine dip) is a great side dish for any mezze or meal.

When serving baba ganoush, it is always topped with a good glug of extra virgin olive oil.

Beet borscht, a gorgeous soup of Eastern European origin, is filled with summer-to fall produce and is as good (maybe better) served chilled as it is hot. Honestly, you can make borscht year round.

If it weren’t for the fact that it’s a bit messy to make, I’d have it regularly. As it is, I most enjoy it on special occasions, such as Rosh HaShanah (the Jewish New Year). It’s actually a favorite on this holiday for its subtle sweetness.

A Russian proverb says, “Borscht and bread will make your cheeks red.” Serve this with slices of fresh vegan challah and see if it’s true. I don’t recommend making this soup unless you have a food processor with a grating blade. Of course, you could do this with a hand grater, but you may never forgive me.

Everyone loves hummus — or at least, everyone I know! Here’s an easy homemade hummus recipe, with 12 tasty variations.

While packaged hummus is available almost anywhere food is sold, I still enjoy making my own. It’s easy and tastes better than store-bought. And this DIY version is more economical, yielding a larger quantity.

Hummus is useful as a spread for fresh pita as an appetizer, as well as in sandwiches and wraps. It’s also nice as a dip for cut fresh vegetables, including carrots, bell peppers, turnips, and celery.

This simple, tasty, creamy dip is perfect as an easy side or as a schmear on your Yom Kippur break-fast bagel. It’s healthy, easy, and delicious!