Quinoa & Greens Nourish Bowl (WFPB)

Nourish bowls, also known as macro bowls/buddha bowls/grain bowls, are a large bowl of grains, greens, veggies… They can basically be whatever you want but the important point is that there’s a large variety of things in your bowl. Each bowl starts with some kind of base (rice, other grains, cooked sweet or regular potatoes, salad greens, darker leafy greens, etc.) and then a mix of whatever you like is built on top. This particular bowl features both fluffy cooked quinoa and spring greens, topped with roasted broccoli and asparagus (something cooked), cherry tomatoes and herbs (something fresh), sauerkraut (something pickled), roasted seasoned chickpeas (something crunchy), and a beautiful miso lemon tahini dressing. You can put anything you like in your nourish bowl, but if you’d like to try this one, all the individual components are listed out in an easy to follow format below. You can prep all these ingredients at one time if you like, and store them in your refrigerator to eat throughout the week. You can eat your nourish bowl cold, warm, or a mix of the two. Heat up any individual component and combine when you’re ready. Enjoy experimenting! This recipe was contributed by Liz and Paul Madsen of Zardyplants, a vegan food blog.

What could be better than a dish that is not only suitable to be offered as bhoga to the supreme, but is directly connected to Krsna and his eternal associates? According to the Mahabharata, this plant-based sattvic subji was created by Bhima himself during the Pandava’s exile. You are FOR REAL going to wish you had Draupadi’s Akshaya Patra, capable of manifesting unlimited food, so you can enjoy endless Aviyal! Check out the complete step-by-step guide to making this Vegan Aviyal (Kerala-style Avial Vegetable Subji), along with information about modifying it to suit different dietary needs. This recipe was contributed by Chef Adam Sobel from The Cinnamon Snail, a vegan and kosher caterer located in New Jersey.

Get ready to sesa-meet your new favorite dressing! It’s time to unlock the ses-amazing potential of your salads! Check out the complete step-by-step guide to making this Goma Dressing (Japanese Roasted Sesame Dressing), along with information about modifying it to suit different dietary needs. This recipe was contributed by Chef Adam Sobel from The Cinnamon Snail, a vegan and kosher caterer located in New Jersey.

This traditional vegan Turkish appetizer will have you rocking the house party (len)til the break of dawn. These vegan lentil meatballs aren’t just good, they’re (bul)GUR-EAT! Check out the complete step-by-step guide to making this Mercimek Köfte (Turkish Bulgur & Lentil Meatballs), along with information about modifying it to suit different dietary needs. This recipe was contributed by Chef Adam Sobel from The Cinnamon Snail, a vegan and kosher caterer located in New Jersey.

Loubia is here to make you go “beananas” with every nourishing spoonful. You will wonder where this recipe “bean” has been all your life. Check out the complete step-by-step guide to making this Loubia (Moroccan Stewed White Beans), along with information about modifying it to suit different dietary needs. This recipe was contributed by Chef Adam Sobel from The Cinnamon Snail, a vegan and kosher caterer located in New Jersey.

I’m new to polenta but found it to be delicious and this meal lasted me for three days!

This newly created recipe was a hit with all the guests we hosted this weekend. Everyone asked for a second, third, and fourth piece. I was really pleased!

These delicious blueberry pancakes are super fluffy and you wouldn’t even know they’re actually good for you!

This version of a Passover lasagna will be a hit at your Seder, and you’ll be tempted to make it throughout the year. (Go ahead. Give in to that temptation.)

A twist on traditional sweet kugel, this is a savory kugel with spinach. Dairy and egg-free, easy and quick to make, and a crowd pleaser that’s perfect for any Jewish holiday or even a weeknight dinner. This vegan spinach noodle kugel recipe was contributed by Liz and Paul Madsen of Zardyplants, a vegan food blog.