Seven Species Muffins

These muffins are a great not-too-sweet treat for your Tu BiShvat celebration as they contain all seven species mentioned in the Torah: wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives, and dates.

And no, there are no olives actually in the muffins. (The muffins do include olive oil. If you do not eat oil, you may substitute unsweetened applesauce and if you still want to have the seven species, you can blend a single olive into the fig and date mixture!).

Matzo Brei is a classic Jewish frittata-like breakfast food often eaten at Passover. In this vegan version, soft, savory chickpea “eggs” flecked with mushrooms and rosemary contrast deliciously with shards of crispy, slightly charred matzah crackers. It’s comfort food through and through. Also a soy-free, nut-free recipe, can be gluten-free.

If you, your family or guests are plant-based or allergic to fish, a vegan smoked salmon is super easy to make with this vegan lox recipe! Typical vegan smoked salmon recipes can take up to 3 days of preparation, but not this carrot lox recipe! It’s much quicker.

This vegan lox recipe is so fast and simple. It’s great to make on the weekend to use for Sunday brunch or as a food prep for the rest of the week!

Whether you have a barbeque smoker or just whip up my marinade, you can have fun with different ways to prepare this delicious plant-based recipe.

Matzo brei is a kind of flat omelet that’s a classic breakfast during Passover week and beyond. This recipe will show you how to make a vegan matzo brei, without the customary eggs. It’s easiest to make this one serving at a time in a small skillet; for more servings, repeat the recipe as needed.

Basically, matzo brei consists of broken matzah that’s softened with hot water, then mixed with scrambled egg and fried. Not exactly your powerhouse breakfast — after all, matzah isn’t exactly a super food — it’s one of those Eastern European specialties that’s suffused with nostalgia. Here we replace the egg, easily and cleverly!

A trio of egg substitutes: I give you three choices for the egg substitute that will hold the matzo brei together. Two of the options—oats (which are hametz) and garbanzo (chickpea) flour (legumes are kitniyot) are ingredients that aren’t allowable foods during the Passover week for those who adhere strictly.

Sephardic tradition still allows legumes and some other kitniyot during Passover week. Some Ashkenazi traditions have started to allow kitniyot, too. If you’re fine with that, go ahead and try this with garbanzo flour.

Quinoa flakes, as a derivative of the relatively recently allowable food, quinoa, is the most Passover-friendly option. That’s my favorite “glue” for my Vegan Matzah Balls.

If you adhere to Passover food rules, you can always wait until after the holiday week to make matzo brei. Like most everyone else who celebrates, you’ll likely have plenty of leftover matzah to use up.

Make sure to explore the variations: Often, matzo brei is enjoyed just as is; straight from the pan, lightly salted. Incorporating a little bit of fruit into the batter (banana, apple, or pear) into the batter is a lovely touch; you can also make it savory with baby spinach or other baby greens and/or fresh herbs.

A Shavuot favorite, plant-based!